seniorchanges

Prize night at Brisbane Girls Grammar 1933

Year 12 assessment and university entrance rankings are set to undergo their biggest transformation in more than two decades with the completion of a major review into Queensland’s Overall Position (OP) system.

Minister for Education, Training and Employment John-Paul Langbroek said the independent review had been conducted over more than 12 months, including extensive consultation with educators, universities, parent associations and unions.

He said the government would use the Queensland Review of Senior Assessment and Tertiary Entrance Processes to develop a more modern and equitable alternative.

“When it comes to education, the Queensland Government is determined to give students every opportunity to enjoy a bright future,” Mr Langbroek said.

“The OP system has served Queensland well since its introduction in 1992, but is becoming less relevant as education evolves.

“Twenty years ago, Year 12 mainly comprised students who intended to go to university but today, most Year 12 students successfully combine an academic range of courses and vocational qualifications, providing options for further education, training and work.

“As a result we have seen a decrease in the percentage of Year 12 students awarded an OP. In 1992, about 80 per cent of Year 12 students received an OP. By 2013, this had dropped to 54 per cent.

“In contrast, 57 per cent of Year 12 students completed a vocational education and training qualification in 2009, increasing to 67 per cent in 2013.

“We want Queensland to be at the forefront of the best education practices nationally and internationally and to achieve this we must have a modern tertiary entrance system that reflects the needs of students.”

Led by Professor Geoff Masters and Doctor Gabrielle Matters, the review by the independent Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) includes a range of recommendations.

Mr Langbroek said the Queensland Government would carefully consider the content of the review before developing the official government response.

“Any changes that arise from this process will likely be phased in over a number of years, to ensure senior students are able to plan their post-schooling pathways,” he said.

“I need to stress that current Year 11 and 12 students will not be impacted when the government releases its response.

“I’d like to thank Professor Masters and Doctor Matters for their hard work in preparing this extensive review – their efforts will be invaluable to educational reform in our state.

“Their work will help us develop a modern senior schooling and tertiary entrance system that accurately reflects the multitude of opportunities available to young Queenslanders today.”

The final report recommendations are available at: www.acer.edu.au/queenslandreview

 

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