Mojo Juju and Frank Sultana

MoJo Juju supporting Frank Sultana on stage on Saturday night

“You’re disrespecting my staff and you’re disrespecting me. Get your stuff and f*** off back over the river where you came from.”

This was how the ‘no-dickheads’ policy was observed at one of West End’s favourite haunts. Bring your friends, enjoy a drink and love the music but leave your attitude on the northside.

Seven years ago Jodi found a small piece of West End that was crying out for love and attention. The former Coronation Hotel is a magnificent example of Brisbane’s colonial architecture from 1891. It was into this space that Jodi brought energy, love, hard work, perseverance and a passion for live music. The welcome mat was laid out in secret little spot on a street called Hope across from a working milk factory. Very West End.

Over the years The Joynt’s small venue hosted many of quirky performance and plenty of rising stars. Jodi’s support of musicians endeared her to many. For a time up-and-coming bands heard of this mystical place called The Joynt where punters were in your lap. If you played with heart and soul then all could have a rocking good time. The place had magic. Many shows felt as if the coolest 50 people in all of Brisbane had found the best venue and the best band for the first time.

Bertie Page and Lena Marlene charted the return of Brisbane’s cabaret from The Joynt. Incredible performers took to the stage, many for the first time, to ply their well-practiced, sometimes earnest, routines on expectant audiences. Bertie’s wit and verve was a perfect compliment to the sweaty rock bands –and she was more than a match for the odd stray yob.

One of my enduring pleasures is sitting out on the Montague Road side with a tallie, listening to the live sounds pouring off the stage while catching a glimpse of a train passing along the bridge between two factories.

That view, The Joynt and the woman that created it are irreplaceable. Thanks Jodi, we’ll see you around.

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